Winter craft fair – 4to Observatorio Cultural

This past weekend I participated in the 4to Observatorio Cultural.  It was hard work, (long days and cold), but a lot of fun!

Obs401This was my second fair and I was better prepared and more relaxed. I did some research on the internet about craft fairs, and learned how to display my woolly items better.

Obs402I also packed myself a good lunch and took coffee in a Thermos, perfect for the cold mornings! (I know, I said I was going to stop drinking coffee… but the odd one, or two is so nice!)

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I carded different breeds of sheep’s wool, alpaca, and mohair and then spun them on my wheel and drop spindle. People were amazed by the different textures and how the “fluffy fibre” was transformed into a yarn.

Obs403There were so many lovely hand crafted gifts and a really great atmosphere.

Here are a few pictures of some of the stalls; jewellery, honey, shoes, felted clothes, yarn, and plants are just some of the things that were on sale.

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More photos can be seen on Creatif’s facebook page for the 4to Observatorio Cultural.

And I have a small confession to make. I have a guilty pleasure that goes against all my woolly work…and it is called polar fabric.

As much as I love spinning wool from my sheep and goats, I find it hard to wear around my neck. Luckily my husband has no problem and he has a great selection of wool and mohair scarves. I, however, live in polar clothes in the winter. So when I saw this cape at the fair I couldn’t resist.

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And depending how I wear the hood I either look like the grim reaper or little red riding hood!

Where has the sun gone?

First it rained.

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Sheldon isn’t bothered by the rain

Then the sun came out and everything turned green and beautiful.

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And then the sun went away, and we have been left with cold, wet, grey days.

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We are accustomed to misty mornings and grey days, but we haven’t seen the sun in over a week. Clothes are not drying on the laundry line, children are staying home with colds, and where ever you go, people are complaining about the cold.

We are lucky, we have a wood burning stove that keeps us warm. But most businesses, schools and homes do not have heating, so I have been knitting and weaving for my family.

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A warm hug of wool to keep loved ones warm on these grey days.

Do lambs need scarves?

I don’t think so.  however, I have been busy weaving scarves and watching the new lambs.

A third lamb was born last week, and she is more blond than black.  I am still not sure of the breed of these sheep, and when some are born light brown it confuses me even more.

Wake up little girl, new lamb to the left, (and a goose at the back pulling wool off the sheep).

The twin lambs are getting bigger, but I still can’t get a great picture of them.

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As well as watching the lambs I have been making different shaped looms and weaving. The scarves were woven on a loom similar to the continuous square loom, except that the loom is a long thin rectangle.  The continuous weave is more complicated than on the square loom but the result is very pretty.

Continuous or diagonal weave

With the same loom and a horizontal weave I used some of my hand spun in these two scarves.

The hand spun and other yarn in these scarves were dyed in my solar oven.

I have also been using yarn I bought from Mary Dubo’s store.  The yarn is similar to the yarn I have been dying but in different colours.  I bought a purple, teal and brown.

Before washing

After washing, or fulling, the scarf softened.

After the scarf has been fulled

 

The colours are bit different in the last photograph because it was taken in the shade.